Advertisement

MINDS IN MOTION®: A COMMUNITY-BASED PHYSICAL AND SOCIAL RECREATION PROGRAM PROMOTING A HEALTHY ACTIVE LIFESTYLE FOR PEOPLE WITH DEMENTIA AND THEIR CARE PARTNERS

      Background

      People with dementia are at an increased risk of social isolation and injury associated with cognitive changes and functional decline. Combining physical, mental and social stimulation can decrease the risk of developing Alzheimer’s and may slow the disease progression (OBI. 2013). Minds in Motion® (MiM) is a community-based social program that incorporates physical and mental stimulation for people with dementia and their care partners, delivered once weekly for 2 hours over 8 weeks. This was originally developed in British Columbia and adapted in Ontario, Canada’s largest province in March 2014. The program is hosted by the Alzheimer Society in over 24 communities and delivered in municipal recreation centres, older adult centres or similar multi-service facilities. MiM is in pilot phase until March 2016. This presentation will include conclusive program evidence around participant and staff experience and overview of the design and feasibility of the program.

      Methods

      The objective of MiM is to create safe and supportive environments for people living with dementia to encourage healthy active lifestyles post diagnosis and provide opportunities for service providers to enhance their program delivery and development skills. MiM is evaluated using standardized templates for physical assessments, participant self reports on mood, impact of program on daily life activities and general satisfaction reviews by both participants and service delivery personnel. Alzheimer Society staff and volunteers administer the evaluations and track outcomes. Evaluations indicate 96% of participants enjoy the program with 85% of them returning for additional MiM sessions. 17% of participants leave the program during the 8 weeks, usually due to progression of dementia or other co-morbidities. 90% of staff and volunteers indicate an increase in their knowledge related to dementia and working with older adults. 53% of participants report they have developed new relationships through MiM.

      Conclusion

      The Success of this program is reliant on strong community partnerships to run and promote the program, standardized training and curriculum, volunteer support, reliable transportation options for participants and flexibility in activities to accommodate various abilities. MiM is creating inclusive and supportive environments helping to normalize the experience for participants and expose them to recreation opportunities.