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LONGITUDINAL CHANGES IN GREY MATTER CONNECTIVITY ARE RELATED TO COGNITIVE DECLINE IN PRODROMAL ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

      Patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and amyloid aggregation have prodromal Alzheimer’s disease (AD). These patients show considerable variability in their trajectories of cognitive decline, which is not well understood. Lower grey matter brain connectivity in prodromal MCI is associated with a 3-fold increased risk to develop dementia. Here, we studied whether longitudinal changes in grey matter connectivity are associated with the rate of cognitive decline over time in amyloid positive MCI patients.
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